International Japanese competition honours for Perse pupils

Perse pupils demonstrated their Japanese knowledge with success in the Education Perfect International Languages Championships.

The three-day online competition took place during half term with students invited to choose any content they wished to study on the Education Perfect languages platform and earn points from answering questions correctly.

A Perse Year 9 team took part and they came first among the UK schools participating in the Japanese category involved as well as fifth overall against teams from across the world.

On top of this, Milton Saibrosa won a Gold award for collecting over 1,000 points, Kiana Mackie claimed Silver (over 750), Alessandro Manavski Bronze (over 500) and Theodore Chui a Credit certificate (over 300).

Milton was thrilled with his contribution to the overall result and enjoyed taking part, having only begun learning the language via the Perse Japanese Club at the start of term.

He said: “I’m a beginner in Japanese, but it was based not so much on what you already knew as how many new things you wanted to learn.

“I had to put a lot of hours into it, to get the 1,000 points, but I found it really fun. I had to learn a lot of new things as with basic vocabulary you can’t get very far.

“It was also nice to compete with my friends from Japanese Club to see who could get the highest score, so it was a great experience.”

As a Brazilian Portuguese speaker, Milton said he had an understanding of many Latin-based languages, but was interested in pushing his linguistic skills further by trying Japanese. 

He added: “I watch a lot of anime (Japanese animation) in Japanese with subtitles and you actually pick up a few words from that, but after joining Japanese Club, I come home and think ‘now I understand this!’

“It’s really fun learning all the different characters and symbols and it’s been a really good experience.

“I think the mentality you have to go with when learning Japanese is to forget you speak any other languages and be as if you’re a toddler learning a new language because pretty much nothing is going to be the same.

“You have to be very open-minded, with studying completely different grammatical rules and alphabets, but I’m really looking forward to continue learning it to the extent where I can fluently speak the language.”

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